Kefir water vs. Kombucha

Kefir water vs. Kombucha

Kefir water vs. Kombucha

Kefir water and Kombucha- what are they and what is the difference between them. Some of you may have heard of Kombucha and maybe you have even tried it but do you know why it is good for you and how easy it is to make? Kefir water is a little less know but similar.

What are they?

Kombucha and Kefir water are both fermented beverages.

Kombucha is made with a SCOBY (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast), held together by polysaccharides. It looks like a mushroom but is not a fungus. Kombucha is known to contain a variety of yeast and bacteria.

Kefir water is made of “grains” which are a colony of bacteria and yeast. They look like small translucent grains. The term “grains” is only used to describe their appearance. Kefir grains contain no actual grains such as wheat, rye. Etc. They also contain a variety of bacteria and yeast.

Preparation and time frame:

Kombucha is prepared by adding starter tea and a kombucha culture (your SCOBY) to sweet tea (black, green, oolong, etc). This Is then fermented for 5 to 30 days depending on the flavor you desire.

Water kefir is prepared by adding water kefir grains to sugar water (we add a little molasses and baking soda for added minerals). This is then fermented for 24-48 hours.

Do you flavor them?

Kombucha is tangy, kind of sweet and effervescent. The flavor varies greatly depending on how long you allow it to ferment and the tea that you use. The fermenting or culture time really determines whether the kombucha tea has a very mild taste or a strong vinegar-like taste. Kombucha can be flavored or you can drink it plain as well.

Water kefir can be sweet and the longer we let it ferment or culture the less sugary it is. It is recommended that you flavor water kefir because the taste of plain water kefir isn’t as pleasing.

Which is better?

Kombucha can aid in our digestion It also adds to our beneficial bacteria in our gut and it contains some acids and enzymes to aid in breaking down food.

Water kefir is more so a probiotic drink. It contains acids and enzymes to aid in digestion though not quite as strong as those in kombucha. Water kefir does, however, have a greater number of bacteria strains than kombucha.

Both drinks are very beneficial in aiding our natural body systems and both are great for hydration. Depending on what flavor you like and the health benefits you are looking for, consuming one or both is a matter of individual preference.

 


Kombucha
Water kefir
Brew time
5-30 days
24-48 hours
Brews in
Sweetened tea (black, green oolong)
Sugar water(juice or coconut water can be used)
Batch size
Quantity not limited by the size of scoby
Limited to size depending on the amount of grains(usually about a gallon)
Flavor
Tart, slightly vinegary. Gets stronger as it brews
Sweet. Should be flavored with fruit juice or extracts
Carbonation
Effervescent
Slightly bubbly(very bubbly after 2nd fermentation)
Drink it plain?
Yes, but flavor is good too!
Not recommended
Contains
Probiotic & yeast
Probiotic & yeast
Culture growth
The mother SCOBY always produces a baby which can be given away.
Grains will multiply- sometimes slower and other times very quickly.
Health Benefits
Detoxifier & digestive support.
General health & probiotic supplement.

 

Instructions for making Kefir Water

  1. Pour 1/4 cup sugar into the jar.
  2. Add 1/2 cup hot water.
  3. Swirl to dissolve the sugar.
  4. Add 3 cups room temperature or cool water.
  5. Check the temperature of the liquid to make sure it’s room temperature ( 68°-85°F.)
  6. Add the water kefir grains
  7. Cover the jar and place in a warm spot, 68°-85°F, to culture for 24-48 hours.
  8. After culturing is complete, prepare a new batch of sugar water, (steps 1-4 above).
  9. Separate kefir grains from the finished water kefir.
  10. Place kefir grains in the new batch of sugar water.
  11. The finished water kefir is now ready to consume, or flavor.

 

Making Larger Batches

To make larger batches, use up to 2 cups grains and use 1 cup cane sugar per gallon of water.

The best method for removing water kefir grains from finished water kefir is to use a plastic mesh strainer. Simply set the strainer on top of a clean jar and pour the entire batch of finished water kefir through the strainer into the jar, catching the grains. Transfer the grains immediately to the new batch of sugar water.

Kombucha Ingredients & Ratios:

One-Quart Batch:

  • 1½ teaspoon loose tea OR 2 tea bags
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2-3 cups water
  • ½ cup starter tea or vinegar

Half-Gallon Batch:

  • 1 tablespoon loose tea OR 4 tea bags
  • ½ cup of sugar
  • 6-7 cups water
  • 1 cup starter tea or vinegar

Gallon Batch:

  • 2 tablespoons loose tea OR8 tea bags
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 13-14 cups water
  • 2 cups starter tea or vinegar

Instructions for Making Kombucha Tea

  1. Combine hot water and sugar in a glass jar. Stir until the sugar dissolves. The water should be hot enough to steep the tea but does not have to be boiling.   
  2. Place the tea or tea bags in the sugar water to steep.
  1. Cool the mixture to 68-85ºF. The tea may be left in the liquid as it cools or removed after the first 10-15 minutes. The longer the tea is left in the liquid, the stronger the tea will be.
  2. Remove the tea bags or completely strain the loose tea leaves from the liquid.
  3. Add starter tea from a previous batch to the liquid. If you do not have starter tea, distilled white vinegar may be substituted.
  4. Add an active kombucha SCOBY.
  5. Cover the jar with a tight-weave towel or coffee filter and secure with a rubber band.
  6. Allow the mixture to sit undisturbed at 68-85°F, out of direct sunlight, for 7-30 days, or to taste. The longer the kombucha ferments, the less sweet and more vinegary it will taste.
  7. Pour kombucha off the top of the jar for consuming. Retain the SCOBY and enough liquid from the bottom of the jar to use as starter tea for the next batch.
  8. The finished kombucha can be flavored and bottled if desired or enjoyed plain.
Grab your kit from me here with instructions and a SCOBY/grains depending on what you are wanting to try! Just message me and I will hook you up! 


Have you tried either? Which drink are you ready to try? 

What is your favorite flavor?

God Bless!

Amanda

P.S. link to the podcast here to listen more details on this!

7 Days to a Sourdough Starter

7 Days to a Sourdough Starter

7 Days to a Sourdough Starter



Sourdough is a healthier option for all my bread loving friends. It is oddly satisfying to make it completely from scratch as well. Bonus it’s really not hard- lol!


Contrary to popular belief, starting your own sourdough is relatively easy.

First select a high protein flour, around 12 grams of protein is a good number. I personally use King Arthur unbleached, unbrominated, non-GMO flour. It has 11 grams of protein and none of the yuck!

You will also want good water. I use reverse osmosis water but you could use distilled or Berkey water too.

Then grab a kitchen scale. Weighing out your ingredients is the best way to have the perfect amount of everything you need and get the best sourdough starter started. 😉

 

Day 1 is simple

Measure out 4 oz of water and 4 oz of flour.

Mix them together in a 1/2 gallon mason jar covered.

Store above the refrigerator.

Allow to sit undisturbed until day 2


 

Day 2

 

Grab your mason jar!

Is yours starting to bubble?

You might not notice too much yet but you will!

Today you will be adding:

4 oz water &  4 oz flour

Mix it well.

Cover and store above the refrigerator.

Done!

Day 3

 Here we go again!

Add:

4 oz of water & 4 oz of flour

Mix together, cover and store above the fridge

 

Day 4

 

Add:

4 oz water

4 oz flour

Mix well, cover, and store above the fridge.

How is your starter looking? Do you see some growth?


Day 5

 

Grab your scale!

Add:

4 oz water

4 oz flour

Mix it up, cover it, and place it above the fridge or warm area fermentation.

 

 

Day 6

 

Add:

4 oz water

4 oz flour

Mix it up, cover it and store it in a warm area (above the fridge works well)

You should be noticing some growth and lots of bubbles!!


Day 7

 

Add:

4 oz water

4 oz flour

Mix it up, cover it and store it in a warm area for another 6-12 hours.


It is now ready to use!! You can take some out for your first batch of goodies or put in the fridge to store until you are ready to use it.

When you are ready to make something, remove from the refrigerator, allow to sit at room temperature for a minimum of 4-6 hours(sometimes longer depending on the recipe)

Every week you will take your sourdough starter out and feed it. This is a super simple- add 4 oz of water and 4 oz of flour. I like to take mine out for a few hours before and after feeding it to allow it to ferment a bit as well.

What are you going to make first?

Do you want, in my honest opinion, the best Sourdough Bread recipe ever? Click here and check it out!

 

God Bless! 

Amanda

Why Sourdough?

Why Sourdough?
Sourdough bread… can you picture it? Fresh baked, just out of the oven. Slap a hunk of butter on it and watch it start to melt…sooooo good!
 
So why sourdough? What makes it better than other breads?
 
Well for starters, it's fermented. This gives it the prebiotic and probiotic benefits which are something we want to maintain a healthy gut. The naturally occurring yeast that is in wheat comes out when we mix the flour with some water and allow it to ferment at room temperature. As it ferments, it grows a culture that is similar to the culture found in yogurt (lactobacillus if we want to get all scientific). We “feed” our starter over the course of a week and allow that culture to grow. Once we have a good starter, we are ready to start making all of the sourdough goodies. You can make bread(obviously), as well as pizza, pancakes, buns and so much more.
 
Some of the additional benefits of sourdough are that you get more vitamins, minerals & antioxidants that your body can more readily absorb because of the fermentation process. It also makes gluten more digestible. This is super helpful for those with gluten sensitivities. It also tends to stay with you longer, meaning that you will be fuller for a longer period of time. The flour is soaked in the process of making sourdough bread(while you are letting it rest), so it does noes not cause the blood sugars to jump as regular bread does.
 
So now how hard is it to make this beloved sourdough? Well, first you need a starter(hope over to my Facebook group and follow along with our 7-day challenge). The starter is a fairly simple process that only takes a few minutes every day for 7 days and a few supplies. Grab yourself a kitchen scale, a mason jar, flour, and water, and you are ready to go. Once you have your starter, you are ready to start making all the sourdough goodness your family can handle.
 
Are you in? If you are ready to get started, hop on over to our Facebook community to start the 7 Day Sourdough Starter Challenge. Your family will thank you later, I promise!
 
God Bless!
 Amanda